AB-187: California Children’s Services Program

Session: 2015-2016
Author: Bonta
Status: Signed into Law (Chaptered)
AAP-CA Position: Support
To view the status of this bill on the State Website, click here.

This bill would extend the prohibition against CCS covered services being incorporated into a Medi-Cal managed care contract  for one more year, through 2017, providing the AAP-CA and others to work with the state on quality, monitoring and evaluation  if  changes in structure are made.
Letter of Support to Author

AAP Positional Letter



April 2, 2015

Assemblymember Bonta
State Capitol, Room 6005
Sacramento, CA 95814

Re: AB 187 (Bonta) California Children’s Services Program (CCS)
AAP-CA Position: SUPPORT

Dear Assemblymember Bonta,

The American Academy of Pediatrics, California (AAPCA), representing nearly 5000 primary
care and subspecialty pediatricians statewide, strongly supports your bill AB 187 to preserve the
integrity of the California Children’s Services Program, which supports a quality system of care
for all children in California and finances direct services for over 170,000 children with complex
and acute special needs. In particular, AB 187 would extend the CCS carve-out from managed care
until the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has completed an evaluation of the two
CCS pilots that were authorized in 2010. The current carve out is scheduled to sunset January 1,
2016.

The California Children’s Services Program (CCS) is well-established, with existing systems (i) to
set standards for quality care for all of California’s children and (ii) that directly case manage and
ensure the provision of high-quality care for children with special health care needs. The program
receives high marks in satisfaction and quality of care from both the families that it serves and
the health care providers that provide services through the program. Your legislation, AB 187, is
critically important to ensure that CCS is able to continue this essential work.

The alternative that could occur in the absence of this statutory protection, i.e., forcing CCS-eligible
children into Medi-Cal managed care for all their services in the name of “streamlining” or
simplification, would be wrong. These children do not have “simple” conditions that can be
appropriately addressed without the years of experience and cutting-edge knowledge available to
them via CCS. Thecomplex and catastrophic pediatric conditions these children have, including
cystic fibrosis, cerebral palsy, sickle cell disease, cancer, prematurity, congenital heart disease,
require specialized care.

Recently, the Department of Health Care Services assembled the CCS Redesign Stakeholder
Advisory Board (RSAB). The American Academy of Pediatrics, California, participates in the
RSAB with both our Chair and our CEO as members of the stakeholder panel. We support this
important effort by the state to evaluate data relative to the CCS program and to develop a
framework for appropriate improvements going forward. AB 187 is necessary to ensure that the
care that children receive through CCS is not disrupted while these efforts are underway.

California pediatricians thank you for your leadership and public service, and we stand in strong
support of AB 187 as a top priority for our members and for all children in California.

Sincerely,

Kris Sig

Kris Calvin
Chief Executive Officer
American Academy of Pediatrics, California

cc: AAP-CA Leadership